Elliott Eglash

Elliott Eglash

Elliott Eglash

Elliott Eglash is a writer and editor currently working on his MFA in nonfiction writing at Columbia. His work has appeared in Musée Magazine, The Believer Logger, the Nassau Literary Review, and elsewhere. New to wine writing, he’s been drinking wine since at least age 21. His work can be found at https://elliott-eglash.squarespace.com

  1. Florian Gojer Explores the Compelling Contrasts of Santa Maddalena

    Florian Gojer Explores the Compelling Contrasts of Santa Maddalena

    The Gojers are among the oldest and most respected vintners in Alto Adige—in 1987, Florian Gojer was the first producer in the Santa Maddalena region to bottle a wine from a specific vineyard, Vigna Rondell, in order to express the site’s distinctive character. Florian Gojer, his son, is now in the process of taking over the winery. At age 21, he planted the estate’s first white vines, leading to the Gojer family’s first white wines a few years later. We had a chance to ask Florian some questions about his family’s history and his estate’s future. 

    Elliott Eglash: What do you think makes your growing region special or distinctive? 

    Florian Gojer: Alto Adige is a contrast-full wine region. While in warm valley locations strong red wines find excellent conditions, in cool mountain locations white wines grow which reflect the alpine freshness. If we look at our own wines, it is very similar: In Santa Maddalena, the warmest location of the country, fine St. Maddalena wines grow in steep hillside locations and in the Bolzano Valley locations the heat-loving and powerful Lagrein wines. On the other hand, our white wines Kerner, Sauvignon and Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc), come from sites between 600 and 730 meters above sea level, where cool downdrafts from the mountain maintain the acidity and provide fresh aromas.

    Tell me about the history of your estate, and how you came to be involved in it and in winemaking.

    The Glögglhof is the name of the estate and farmhouse. Traditionally the farmhouses have names. 'Glöggl' means little bell, 'hof' stands for estate. The Glögglhof dates back to the 14th century and wine has always been produced here from the associated vin...

  2. thoroughbred

    Thoroughbred, and Thoroughly Delicious: An Interview with Bill Cromwell of Pinhook

    "Our founder was a sommelier for a long time, so we started to look at whiskey a little bit more like wine." -Bill Cromwell

  3. Made in Terrassenmosel: Sarah Löwenstein of Weingut Heymann-Löwenstein

    Made in Terrassenmosel: Sarah Löwenstein of Weingut Heymann-Löwenstein

    To grow wine on these steep and rocky slopes requires dedication, perseverance, and a standard of hands-on care that is almost unparalleled in modern winemaking.
  4. Johannes Tiefenbrunner and the High-Altitude Wines of Alto Adige

    Johannes Tiefenbrunner and the High-Altitude Wines of Alto Adige

    "We try to keep the quality we get from the vineyards because, in the cellar, you can't make things better. You can only keep the quality and make the best of it." -Johannes Tiefenbrunner
  5. Loving Tannat: Germán Bruzzone of Bodega Garzón on Uruguay's Wine Evolution

    Loving Tannat: Germán Bruzzone of Bodega Garzón on Uruguay's Wine Evolution

    "In Uruguay, we produce of course strong Tannat with a lot of tannins, but now we are trying not to express that aggressivity, that tannic face, we are trying to express the other face of the Tannat, it's a soft face with good body of course, good personality." -Germán Bruzzone
  6. Campania: Volcanic Wines from Pompeii to Present Day

    Campania: Volcanic Wines from Pompeii to Present Day

    Literal hotbeds of minerality, nutrients, and flavor, volcanoes provide both the basis of many great wines and the occasion for their consumption.
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